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African Americans in Fort Wayne: The First 200 Years

$14.29
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Overview
The history and contributions of African Americans in northeast Indiana have been largely overlooked. This new publication, African Americans in Fort Wayne: The First 200 Years, does not claim to be a definitive history of the topic. It does, however, recognize and honor the pioneers who have made the African-American community in Fort Wayne what it is today. Through diary excerpts, oral histories, and studies of social organizations, religion, and community, a rich, 200-year heritage is vividly depicted. The story begins in 1794, when evidence points to the first black inhabitant of Fort Wayne. The first known, free black in the area was identified in 1809. During the early part of the 1800s, Indiana state funds partially financed a movement to send Indiana blacks to Liberia. Few left, and those who remained worked diligently to make Fort Wayne their own. The fruits of their labor can be partially seen in the development of the first black church, Turner Chapel A.M.E., which was started in 1849 and has been a pillar of the community since its completion. A migration of African Americans from the south, due to industrialization, greatly increased the population from 1913 through 1927, and new churches, organizations, and opportunities were developed. Today, the black community in Fort Wayne is rightfully proud of its extensive past.
Details
ISBN: 9780738507156
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
Date:
State: Indiana
Series: Images of America
Images: 200
Pages: 128
Dimensions: 6.5 (w) x 9.25 (h)
Author
Author Dodie Marie Miller, a student and freelance writer, offers a penetrating look at Fort Wayne's African-American community through vintage photographs, many never before published. Donated by the African-American Museum of Fort Wayne, the Fort Wayne Historical Museum, and generous members of the community, the images bring to light a people that refused to quit, and who have, as a result, prospered.
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