New Orleans in the Twenties

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Overview
It was a decade of flappers, Prohibition, and unprecedented prosperity that abruptly ended with the crash of '29. In New Orleans, steamships lined the wharves, vaudeville gave way to "talkies," and William Faulkner's Sherwood Anderson and Other Famous Creoles was the first book produced by a new publisher called Pelican Publishing Company. Mary Lou Widmer's fourth retrospect of the city reminisces about how New Orleans welcomed the economic growth of the postwar twenties in its own special way. The Crescent City celebrated this prosperity, giving birth to jazz halls in the Vieux Carr' and launching the careers of musicians like Louis Armstrong. It was the most progressive era in the city's history since before the Civil War. From politics to homelife there is hardly an aspect of life in the twenties Widmer does not touch upon. A full chapter is devoted to how the city known for Bourbon Street and Mardi Gras reacted to Prohibition. Indoor plumbing and electric lights became the standard in homes throughout the city. Transportation opened up new neighborhoods as cars became status symbols and the streetcar system took riders to every neighborhood in the city. Mary Lou Widmer, a native of New Orleans, is former president of the South Louisiana Chapter of Romance Writers of America. She has written several novels set in New Orleans. A certified descendant of settlers in the area prior to the Louisiana Purchase, she is a member of the Louisiana Colonials and the Daughters of 1812. She is also the author of New Orleans in the Thirties, New Orleans in the Forties, and New Orleans in the Fifties, all published by Pelican.
Details
ISBN: 9780882899336
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Pelican Publishing
Date:
State: Louisiana
Series: New Orleans History
Images: 212
Pages: 176
Dimensions: 8.5 (w) x 11 (h)
Author
As a child, Mary Lou Widmer was entertained by the Sunday night vaudeville-style shows at City Park. She whiled away the summers blithely stringing clover necklaces and feasting on nickel snowballs that turned her tongue different colors. Her deep sense of family was fostered by the fact that her parents, brother, and both sets of grandparents lived in various parts of the same two-story double. Maybe that's why she favors Hallmark-type family stories; although she grew up during the Depression, Widmer has sweet memories of a simple childhood in her native New Orleans. Her popular historical series began as her reminiscences in print so that others might relive their own memories of New Orleans at that time. Widmer graduated from Loyola University and then became a high-school teacher of English, journalism, and history. She also has served as the president of the South Louisiana Chapter of Romance Writers and has written several articles featured in New Orleans publications. She is a certified descendant of settlers in the area prior to the Louisiana Purchase and is a member of the Louisiana Colonials and the Daughters of 1812. She considers Rosamunde Pilcher her favorite author and enjoys reading suspense, historical novels, and family-based stories. Widmer, a mother of two and a grandmother of four, resides in Kenner, Louisiana. Mary Lou Widmer has an extensive writing background, including New Orleans in the Twenties, New Orleans in the Thirties, New Orleans in the Forties , New Orleans in the Fifties, New Orleans in the Sixties, and Margaret, Friend of Orphans.
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