Dallas Forever Changed: The Legacy of November 1963

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Overview
A city is redefined by the JFK assassination. As Pres. John F. Kennedy gasped his final breath, the city of Dallas died with him. For decades the city struggled to recover from its image as the City of Hate. Citizens of Dallas were scorned and the city excoriated in the press. Only the passage of time and cultural triumphs such as the Dallas Cowboys and the television show Dallas brought healing and distance. But as the fiftieth anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination drew near, the city of Dallas struggled publicly and privately over proposed commemorations of the event, exacerbated by the lingering questions left unanswered by the Warren Commission’s report. Factions were drawn into conflict over the goals of the public events. Drawing on scores of interviews and primary sources, author Dan Helpingstine paints a full picture of the complex forces that continue to shape Dallas today.
Details
ISBN: 9781455620548
Format: Hardback
Publisher: Pelican Publishing
Date:
State: Texas
Images: 25
Pages: 224
Dimensions: 6 (w) x 9 (h)
Author
Filled with a distinct hunger for knowledge, Dan Helpingstine is a full-time writer with an enduring interest in John F. Kennedy's assassination and presidency. He has read more than two hundred books on Kennedy and has visited Dallas on numerous occasions. During his trips to Dallas, Helpingstine spends time with the people of the city in order to better understand the effects of the assassination on the community psyche. He is particularly fascinated by the way Dallas has struggled with the legacy of the assassination and the way that the assassination has affected the national and international perception of the city. As a freelance journalist, Helpingstine wrote two articles about Kennedy for the Post-Tribune newspaper, worked as a "stringer" for The Times newspaper, and covered high-school basketball and football for a weekly newspaper. An avid baseball fan, Helpingstine wrote four books about baseball and one murder-mystery story. He devoted twenty-two years to the Chicago Lighthouse for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired as a job-placement counselor and a program manager. He speaks frequently at professional conferences, including those in Los Angeles and Chicago. Helpingstine holds a bachelor of arts in political science from Indiana University Northwest and a bachelor of general studies in labor studies. He and his wife, Delia, live in Highland, Indiana, and they have one daughter, Leah.