The 1964 Flood of Humboldt and Del Norte

$21.99
  • Overview
  • Details
  • Author
Overview
The 1964 flood in the Eel and Klamath Rivers drainages represents an extreme weather event. Both the Northern California and Southern Oregon coasts are host to many floods, but the 1964 flood stands out as a representation of the "perfect storm." Three events occurred that led to the flood. First, a cold front moved in and dropped several feet of snow. Second, a warm front called the "pineapple connection" moved in and released lots of rain while melting the snowfall—local measurements varied from 20 to 32 inches of rainwater in three days. And third, the highest tide of the year had backed up debris and water for several miles. At its peak, the Eel River was discharging more than 800,000 cubic feet per second. Another contributing factor was that besides being one of the fastest rising and falling rivers in the world, the Eel River has the heaviest sediment load second only to the Yellow River in China.
Details
ISBN: 9781467130882
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
Date:
State: California
Series: Images of America
Images: 205
Pages: 128
Dimensions: 6.5 (w) x 9.25 (h)
Author
Greg Rumney was the recipient of the Rudy Gillard Collection, which comprises the bulk of the photographs in this book. He and coauthor Dave Stockton Jr. understand the importance of these photographs in lending historical perspective to the Great Christmas Flood of 1964.