Hidden History of the Mohawk Valley: The Baseball Oracle, the Mohawk Encampment and More

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Overview
Much of the history of New York's scenic Mohawk Valley has been recounted time and again. But so many other stories have remained buried, almost lost from memory. The man called the baseball oracle correctly predicted the outcome of twenty-one major-league games. Mrs. Bennett, a friend of Governor Thomas Dewey, owned the Tower restaurant and lived in the unique Cranesville building. An Amsterdam sailor cheated death onboard a stricken submarine. Not only people but once-loved places are also all but forgotten, like the twentieth-century Mohawk Indian encampment and Camp Agaming in the Adirondacks, where Kirk Douglas was a counselor. Local historian Bob Cudmore delves deep into the region's history to find its most fascinating pieces of hidden history.
Details
ISBN: 9781626191211
Format: Paperback
Publisher: The History Press
Date:
State: New York
Series: Hidden History
Images: 72
Pages: 192
Dimensions: 6 (w) x 9 (h)
Author
Bob Cudmore has written a weekly newspaper column on Mohawk Valley history for the Daily Gazette for over a dozen years. He is the author of Stories from the Mohawk Valley, published in 2011 by The History Press. Cudmore published the book You Can't Go Wrong, a satirical look at Upstate life in 2000. That same year, he and Steve Dunn co-produced a WMHT-TV documentary about Amsterdam history, Carpet City.   A radio and television personality, Cudmore began hosting the morning show on Lite 104.7/1570 AM WVTL radio in Amsterdam in 2004. From 1980 to 1993, he hosted the nightly Contact talk show on WGY radio in Albany. A former adjunct instructor in mass media at Albany's College of St. Rose, Cudmore worked in public relations for the State University of New York from 1993 to 2001. He has an MA and BA in English from Boston University. A native of Amsterdam, Cudmore lives in Glenville with his sweetie, Audrey Sears, and has two children: Bob Cudmore Jr. and his companion, Tamar Sarnoff of Baltimore, Maryland; and Kathleen R. Bokan and her husband, Michael Bokan of West Charlton, New York.