Historic Hospitals of Long Beach

$19.19
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Overview
This book outlines the history of both Long Beach and its hospitals. Few other California cities can boast of their efforts to keep the public healthy as can Long Beach. Its first inhabitants, the Tongva, insisted on personal and household hygiene. The moment Long Beach became a city in 1897, officials established a board of public health and appointed a public health officer. Consequently, when epidemics struck, the city had fewer causalities. Residents of Long Beach, like most Americans in the early twentieth century, gave birth, treated illness and even underwent surgery at home. Hospitals were considered places for the poor and the severely infirm or places to quarantine contagious disease. The seaside's "perfect climate" was utilized by sanitariums to market relaxation and recuperation. As Long Beach grew, and its medical professionals became more sophisticated, sanitariums became hospitals. First, Long Beach Hospital, then Seaside, followed by St. Mary's, Community and Harriman Jones. Long a destination for retired and active military, Long Beach was also home to two Naval hospitals and one veteran's hospital.
Details
ISBN: 9781634990943
Format: Paperback
Publisher: America Through Time
Date:
State: California
Images: 120
Pages: 96
Dimensions: 6.5 (w) x 9.25 (h)
Author
GERRIE SCHIPSKE, Long Beach native, healthcare attorney and nurse practitioner, has written five books about her hometown. Schipske served two terms on the Long Beach City Council and has taught healthcare administration at California State University Long Beach for many years. She also served nine years on the Long Beach Board of Health and Human Services and nine years on the Medical Board of California. In this book, Schipske provides a fascinating look at how the city and its healthcare system developed.
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