Southbury Through Time: Remnants of Our Past

$24.99
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Overview
Southbury Through Time: Remnants of Our Past presents the quest to find vestiges of Southbury’s existence from the earliest settlers in their everyday life, through religion, education, industry, and transportation. The town’s location at the end of the Pomperaug Valley and situated along numerous water sources has made it an ideal crossroad throughout history. The intersection of the north-south and east-west paths brought growth opportunities to the town along with manufacturing and a convergence of cultures. The railroad brought Southbury from a town of farmers to an industrial center bringing immigrants to settle here, mingling with historical families. Each culture has added a richness to the town’s character. From the time the Natives arrived and the settlers walked into the valley, clues were left behind about how their early societies functioned and how individuals lived their lives. As we look around modern-day Southbury, we can still see pieces of the various stages of growth. Some have said that nothing interesting ever happened in Southbury, but if one looks closely, its secrets will be revealed through the remnants of our past.
Details
ISBN: 9781635000856
Format: Paperback
Publisher: America Through Time
Date:
State: Connecticut
Series: America Through Time
Images: 230
Pages: 128
Dimensions: 6.5 (w) x 9.25 (h)
Author
In her second book for Fonthill Media, MELINDA K. ELLIOTT has once again matched old photographs with current ones to tell a story. This time she explored the town of Southbury, Connecticut, looking for old and hidden remnants of the town’s 350-year-old history in order to learn their tales. Melinda is involved in several historical endeavors, and is always occupied with historical research. Melinda and her husband have three children and six grandchild that they love to spoil. They love historically-themed road trips, and are always on the lookout for old grist mills, covered bridges, and one-room schoolhouses.
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