Germantown in the Civil War

$21.99
  • Overview
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  • Author
Overview
When the first shots of the Civil War were fired, nearly one-third of Germantown's sons and daughters answered the call to duty. Generals and soldiers, doctors and nurses all fought to preserve the Union. Many were lost, but some returned home to carry on the memory of their fallen comrades through the efforts of the Grand Army of the Republic. The Philadelphia neighborhood was itself transformed when the town hall became Cuyler Hospital and local nurses like Catherine Keyser and Hannah Zell cared for the wounded of Gettysburg and other battles. In this intimate and sharply focused account, local historian Eugene Glenn Stackhouse commemorates the sacrifices of Germantown's proud citizenry.
Details
ISBN: 9781596292062
Format: Paperback
Publisher: The History Press
Date:
State: Pennsylvania
Series: Civil War
Images: 90
Pages: 160
Dimensions: 6 (w) x 9 (h)
Author
Eugene Glenn Stackhouse and his wife moved to East Germantown in 1980, but they began their research into Germantown history long before then. They joined the Germantown Historical Society in 1973, and Mr. Stackhouse was invited to join the board of the Germantown Historical Society in 1993. He served as president of the organization from 1997 to 2001. The author has a degree in biology and worked for a biological publishing company for many years. He was also a part-time professional genealogist. He is now retired. Mr. Stackhouse was a volunteer researcher at the historical society and began to read many of the accounts of the Civil War in the archives of the society, especially those of Naaman Keyser Ployd. Doing his own family history, he learned of ancestors and relatives who had served in the Civil War. He is a direct descendant of three Union soldiers and a collateral descendant of over two hundred Union veterans. He is a member of the Anna M. Ross Camp One, of the Sons of the Union Veterans of the Civil War (SUVCW). He and his wife live in a house in which two Civil War veterans lived and died.