Wicked Danville: Liquor and Lawlessness in a Southside Virginia City

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Overview
Prostitution, gambling, moonshine and drugs could all be found behind closed the closed doors of Danville, VA from 1919 to 1933. During Prohibition, the "Law and Order League," of Danville was, of course, "dry," but the city's mayor was personally was known to be "personally wet," and in 1911 citizens were shocked to discover that the police chief was a fugitive from a murder conviction in Georgia. That same period saw lynching, murders and the wreck of the Old '97. HP authors Frankie Bailey and Alice Green will examine the law and disorder of Prohibition era Danville with Wicked Danville: Crime, Justice, and Prohibition in a Southside Virginia City.
Details
ISBN: 9781609490379
Format: Paperback
Publisher: The History Press
Date:
State: Virginia
Series: Wicked
Images: 46
Pages: 128
Dimensions: 6 (w) x 9 (h)
Author
Frankie Bailey is a professor of criminal justice at SUNY at Albany. She has published numerous books with Overmountain Press, including several books in the Lizzie Stuart Mystery Series and Silver Dagger Mysteries Series. Her research interests are geared towards criminal justice and how it relates to American sociology, particularly race/ethnicity, class and gender. Dr. Alice P. Green is known for her work as a criminal justice activist in New York State. Dr. Green is currently the executive director of The Center for Law and Justice. She served as legislative director for the New York Civil Liberties Union before being appointed to the Citizens Policy and Complaint Review Council of the New York State Commission on Corrections in 1985 and then to the position of deputy commissioner for the New York State Division of Probation and Correctional Alternatives. From 1975 through 1979, Dr. Green served as the executive director of Trinity Institution, a youth and family services center in Albany's South End neighborhood. Dr. Green currently lives with her husband, Charles Touhey, in Albany.
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