Blog

At Arcadia, we believe you can never get enough history. That’s why we have this online blog, where we share unique American history stories, author features, and even some previews of our newest books. Join the community of history buffs here at Arcadia Publishing, and explore even more of American history today!
A Cause Worth Dying For: The Story of The Grimke Sisters
Sarah Grimke (1792-1873) and Angelina Grimke Weld (1805-1879) were two sisters born 13 years apart who shared the deep-seated belief that slavery was not a condition which any human should have to abide. In their fight to end slavery, they came to be strong believers in the importance of equality between men and women, thus becoming prominent speakers for women’s rights as well. 
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The American Textile Worker
Manufacturing has been an important part of the American economy since the late 1800s.  Throughout the Southeast textile mills were established to create jobs for local workers and to keep investments in the community.  Places that were once dominated by an agrarian economy transformed into industrial powerhouses that brought changes to the community and local workers.  People across the country left farms and small towns to work in vastly different industrial environments for a steady paycheck year round.
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9 Fun Facts About Groundhog Day
If you’re the sort of person who has absolutely had enough of winter, cold, and snow by the time February rolls around, you probably also hope the famous Punxsutawney Phil doesn’t see his shadow on February 2nd. According to folklore, a cloudy Groundhog Day on which the groundhog can’t see his shadow after coming out of hibernation signifies spring weather that will arrive before the equinox. A shadow, on the other hand, means six more weeks of winter.
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5 Meaningful Way to Honor President’s Day This Year
For many, President’s Day is simply a reason to enjoy a long weekend away from the office. For others, it’s a day to hit the mall and check out all the specials their favorite department stores are running. In reality, it should be a day to honor those that have led our country over the past 200+ years, especially George Washington, as President’s Day is the federal celebration of his birthday.
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​America’s Largest Home: History of Biltmore Estate
Grand estates conjure up romantic images of ornate architecture, garden parties, lavish balls, and perfectly manicured gardens. The Biltmore Estate in the Blue Ridge Mountains in Asheville, North Carolina is no exception. Encompassing a total area of...
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The Bayou City's Cruiser
How could a history of a cruiser, even one named for Houston, be part of local Houston history? US cities have had US Navy warships named after them almost as long as there has been a United States Navy; from the frigate Boston in 1799 through the newly commissioning littoral combat ship Little Rock this year. 
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Five Ways to Savor Oysters Like a Pro
An oyster’s flavor can vary greatly depending on the environment where it was grown. Even oysters of the same species can have a remarkable range of flavors, and the best way to explore the incredible array of oysters is to compare and contrast
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8 National Parks to Visit to Enjoy the Fall Foliage
If you didn’t quite manage to visit all the national parks you wanted to see this year before summer came to an end, we have excellent news for you. Fall is actually one of the best times of year to see these iconic places in all their glory. Not only is the oppressive summer heat a thing of the past for now, but this is the ideal time to see the foliage of fall at its very best.
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Mobile Under Siege: Surviving the Union Blockade
Mobile, Alabama has always been a uniquely Southern city. From August 1864 to April 1865, the people who lived in Mobile and their stories and experiences in one of the most turbulent times in the city’s existence. This is the time during and after the Battle of Mobile Bay to the surrender of the city to Union forces on April 12, 1865.
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